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Your First Trimester Diet

Eating well now and throughout your pregnancy is crucial. Make sure you get off on the right foot.

If you've tried -- and failed -- in the past to curb your love of take-out pizza and ice cream, perhaps you simply needed the right motivation: nurturing a beautiful, healthy baby. Eating well is especially important now. Your body uses the nutrients and energy provided by the food you eat both to build a healthy baby and to keep your body strong. A healthful diet for pregnancy is one that contains most or all of the essential nutrients your body needs and one that provides the right balance of carbohydrate, fat, and protein without too many calories.

First Trimester Tests

Towards the end of your first trimester, your doctor will recommend prenatal screenings to can help determine whether your child has any chromosomal abnormalities.

When are the tests taken?
Towards the end of your first trimester, usually between weeks 11 and 14.

Why are these tests important?
They can gauge your risk of having a baby with Down syndrome or other chromosomal disorders. A screening test will show whether there is an increased risk for a chromosomal abnormality, but only a diagnostic test will give you definitive answers.

How to Handle a Tough First Trimester

Exhaustion, nausea, sore breasts, and other symptoms are very common during the first trimester. They usually improve by the fourth month, but in the meantime, it helps to know how to cope with some of the typical discomforts.

"I'm exhausted."

Fatigue is by far the most common complaint during the first trimester, says Roger Harms, MD, editor of The Mayo Clinic Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy. Aside from the simple fact that building a baby uses a tremendous amount of your body's resources, you can also blame a steep increase in the hormone progesterone, which is known to have a sedating effect. The extreme sleepiness usually tapers off by eight to 10 weeks and rarely lasts beyond 13 weeks.

Feel better fast: The most important thing is to slow down. Take naps, go to bed early, and let the housecleaning slide for now. You should also continue to exercise -- though you may need to cut back on the intensity of your workouts. In addition to helping you tolerate pregnancy and labor better, exercise can actually increase your energy level, says Terry Hoffman, MD, an ob-gyn at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Not used to working out? Ask your doctor if it's okay to start a simple routine, such as walking for 20 minutes a day.

10 First Trimester To-Dos

Congratulations on your pregnancy! You've seen the positive markers on an at-home pregnancy test and a blood test has confirmed you're expecting. Now what do you do? Our checklist will help you get through your first trimester and pave the way for the rest of your pregnancy ... and your new life with Baby!

Your First Trimester of Pregnancy
What's first on your pregnancy to-do list? Get ready for the next nine month with these helpful tips. We'll guide you through your early-pregnancy essentials and get you on track for your next two trimesters (and beyond!).

Fetal Movement: When Will I Feel Baby Kick?

Experts answer your top questions about your developing baby's movements, from when she'll start kicking to how often you should feel her kick.

I'm a few weeks pregnant. When will my baby start moving?
"Babies are moving right from the beginning," says Raul Artal, M.D., chairman of the department of obstetrics and gynecology and women's health at St. Louis University School of Medicine. "With the advent of ultrasound, we can see some movement as early as six to eight weeks gestation." But you won't feel your baby move for several more weeks, because she's still too small to deliver a noticeable kick.

Twin Fetal Development

These images reveal all the intricate details of a baby's growth -- from a collection of cells to a full-term newborn. While most women may only receive one or two ultrasounds during pregnancy, which is normal, this slideshow of the 3rd trimester of pregnancy gives you a look at each week of development.

Third Trimester Fetal Development

We've partnered with the American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine (AIUM), Johns Hopkins, and the March of Dimes to create this unique peak into Baby's development inside the womb. These images reveal all the intricate details of your baby's growth -- from a collection of cells to a full-term newborn. While most women may only receive one or two ultrasounds during pregnancy, which is normal, this slideshow of the 3rd trimester of pregnancy gives you a look at each week of development.

Second Trimester Fetal Development

We've partnered with the American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine (AIUM), Johns Hopkins, and the March of Dimes to create this unique peak into Baby's development inside the womb. These images reveal all the intricate details of your baby's growth -- from a collection of cells to a full-term newborn. While most women may only receive one or two ultrasounds during pregnancy, which is normal, this slideshow of the 2nd trimester of pregnancy gives you a look at each week of development.

First Trimester Fetal Development

Do you know what to expect in the first trimester of pregnancy? We've partnered with the American Institute of Ultrasound Medicine (AIUM), Johns Hopkins, and the March of Dimes to create this unique peak into Baby's development inside the womb during the first trimester. These images reveal all the intricate details of your baby's growth. While most women normally receive one or two ultrasounds during pregnancy, this slideshow of the first trimester of pregnancy gives you a look at each week of development.

Real Moms' Kookiest Signs Of Pregnancy

You won't believe how these 18 women found out they were expecting!

We all know the typical signs of pregnancy -- morning sickness, a missed period -- but some moms had more offbeat pregnancy symptoms that signaled it was time to take a pregnancy test -- whether or not medical science would agree! Here are some of the weirdest signs of pregnancy we've heard from moms-to-be.

My mother-in-law's dog would follow me and sit on my stomach. After Toby did that the third time, I bought a test. The dog knew before I did. -- Titi Nena

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